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University of Toronto Mississauga
Department of Geography • SPRING 2009

JGE 1609H5S: Cities, Industry and the Environment

 

 Instructor: Pierre Desrochers

 

 Lectures: Mon 3-5PM

 

 Phone: (905) 828-5206

 Office: Davis Building, room 3273

 

 Lecture room: SE 2068 UTM

 

 E-mail: pierre.desrochers@utoronto.ca

 

Course Description

This reading seminar is devoted to the study of the environmental impacts of (mostly urban) industrialization and to past, current and potentially new ways of analyzing and addressing them. The topics discussed range from the history of deforestation and the creation of recycling linkages between firms to the role of institutions in promoting innovative behavior and the impact of geographical distance on the sustainability of industrial practices. Unlike many seminars discussing the relationship between economic growth and the environment, the perspective favored in "Cities, Industry and the Environment" will be generally optimistic.

Mandatory
Readings

Course Assignments

Weekly readings: Students are expected to do the required readings before each class meeting. Prior to class, students should have prepared a single page commentary on the assigned readings. These are not meant to be summaries, but rather should focus on the main arguments being made and how they relate to other readings assigned that week or previously. They will have to be handed to the instructor prior to the beginning of the class and will be returned by the instructor the following week.

Grade: Students must submit a 1-2 page proposal (5% - due by the beginning of week 5) and complete a 15-20 page term paper on a topic related to the broad theme of the course (45% - due on the last day of the semester). The single page commentaries (30%) and class participation (20%) will make up the remainder of the grade.
 

Readings

All readings for this course are freely available to U of T's students through the course Website.

Most of the suggested readings are freely accessible from anywhere. Some of them, however, may require you to use a UofT terminal or user code.

Contacting the instructor

You can contact me at pierre.desrochers@utoronto.ca.

Please read the course syllabus before e-mailing a question or expect a one line answer telling you to look it up if the answer is already there.

Always use your University of Toronto e-mail address (@utoronto.ca) for all course-related communications. E-mails from other domains (e.g., hotmail, Rogers, gmail, yahoo, etc.) may be filtered as spam and will at any rate be ignored. Always include the course code (e.g., JGE1609) as part of your subject line, along with your full name and student number in the body of the e-mail. E-mails will be answered during office hours as promptly as possible. Please note that I do not open attachments and will not answer during week-ends.

The first person that you should e-mail concerning department- or program-related queries or to submit documentation regarding a missed assignment, quiz, or test is the Academic Counsellor for Geography/Environment, Sabrina Ferrari (sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca).

E-mail should NOT be viewed as an alternative to meeting with the TA or professor during office hours. Nor should e-mail be used as a mechanism to receive private tutorials (especially prior to tests) or to explain material that was covered in missed lectures. Not receiving replies to e-mails from the TA or professor, or not receiving them in time, will not be an acceptable excuse for pleas for extensions to assignment or exam deadlines.

Students are advised to consult www.enough.utoronto.ca for information on university policy concerning the appropriate use of information and communication technology.

© PhD Comics
 

Department of Geography Late assignment/Missed Test Policy

This is the departmental policy for late assignments and missed tests. Please note that the penalty related to your proposal is different. In this particular case, I apply my own policy as specified on the syllabus.

I
n-class or Online QUIZ/TESTS: Students CANNOT petition to re-write a quiz/test once the test has begun. If you are feeling ill, please do not start the online or in-class test and seek medical attention immediately. You must have a physician fill out a U of T Student Medical Certificate and submit a request via the online Special Consideration Request form @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest within 24 hours.

Online Submissions for Term Work: It is every student’s responsibility to ensure that their online submission is submitted successfully by the due date. Accommodations will not be made for unsuccessful submissions due to, but not limited to, i) the system timing out ii) submitting the incorrect document(s) iii) poor internet connection / no internet connection etc.

Missed Term Work (Assignment/Lab - as per Department of Geography policy):
Late assignments will be subject to a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) of the total marks for the assignment. Assignments submitted five calendar days beyond the due date will be assigned a grade of zero.

Academic accommodation can be made when an assignment is late. For accommodations on late/missed assignments please see section on "Extension of Time".

Missed Term Work (Quiz/Test - as per Department of Geography policy):
In courses with final exams, there will be no re-writes or make-ups for term tests/quizzes missed for University-accepted, verifiable reasons. Instead, the final exam will be re-weighted by the value of the term test/quiz.

Requesting Academic Accommodation using the Online Special Consideration Request Application: In Geography and Environment courses, professors cannot grant extensions on term work or allow makeups for missed items. If you ask for and receive an extension or a makeup date directly from a professor, without following the appropriate steps as outlined in this document, it will be invalid and may be revoked at any time by the departmental petitions committee.

Informing Your Professor and Submitting Appropriate Documentation:
The following steps must be completed in order to be considered for academic accommodation for any course work such as missed tests or late assignments:

1. Students must inform their professor in writing (e-mail is acceptable) within 24 hours of a test date/assignment due date of any circumstances that prevent them from writing a test or submitting an assignment on time.
2. Students must complete an online Special Consideration Request @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest. Students who miss a test due to circumstances beyond their control (e.g. illness or an accident) can request that the Department grant them special consideration. You must inform your instructor within 24 hours and you have up to one (1) week from the date of the missed test to submit your online request (late requests will NOT be considered without a "letter of explanation" as to why the request is late). You must present your case to the Department (not the Instructor). Note: The system only supports Microsoft Internet Explorer and Firefox for the time being.
3. Original supporting documentation (e.g. Verification of Student Illness or Injury form, accident report, etc) MUST BE SUBMITTED to the DROP BOX (labeled "Environment and Geography Petition Documentation") located outside Room 3282, Davis Building. Supporting documentation is required within 48 hours of submitting your online request.
Please Note: If you missed your test for a reason connected to your registered disability, please be advised that the department will accept documentation supplied by the UTM AccessAbility Resource Centre.
Note: (i) ROSI declarations are not accepted as supporting documentation.
(ii) If your reason for absence is due to a last minute flight due to a family emergency (illness/death etc.) you must provide your flight itinerary INCLUDING the date the flight was purchased as well as boarding passes in addition to proof of death/illness/accident.
4. Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms MUST include the statement "This Student was unable to write the test on date(s) for medical reasons". Documentation MUST show that the physician was consulted within ONE day of the test date. A statement merely confirming a report of illness made by the student is NOT acceptable (such as, "This patient tells me that he was feeling ill on that day."). Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms can be found on the Office of the Registrar's webpage (http://www.illnessverification.utoronto.ca/getattachment/index/Verification-of-Illness-or-Injury-form-Jan-22-2013.pdf.aspx).

Please complete the following:
- Special request link: https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest
- Verification of Illness form: http://www.illnessverification.utoronto.ca/

Please note that the written explanation and documentation that you submit represents an appeal from you, requesting the opportunity to account for that portion of your grade in some other manner. If an appeal is not received, or if the appeal is deemed unacceptable, you will receive a grade of zero for the item you missed. If the appeal is granted - that is, your reason for missing the item is considered acceptable by the committee - then a mechanism for accounting for the grade value of the missed item will be discussed.

A Departmental committee evaluates each request. Decisions will be communicated by email within two weeks of receipt of all completed documents. Note: It is your responsibility to ensure your email account is working and able to receive emails. Claims that a Departmental decision was not received will NOT be considered as a reason for further consideration. Contact Sabrina Ferrari (sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca) Academic Counselor, should you NOT receive notification of your decision within 2 weeks of submission.

Note that holidays and pre-purchased plane tickets, family plans, your friend's wedding, lack of preparation, or too many other tests are not acceptable excuses for missing a quiz, a test, or an item of term work.

Extension of Time
Students are expected to back up their work at all times. As such, extension requests due to computer issues (stolen, crashed, damaged etc.) will not be considered. The following steps must be completed in order to be considered for academic accommodation for any assignment extensions. Assignments handed in AFTER the work has been returned to the class cannot be marked for credit.

1. Students must inform their professor in writing (e-mail is acceptable) IN ADVANCE of an assignment due date of any circumstances that prevent them from submitting their assignment on time.
2. Students must complete an online Special Consideration Request @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest IN ADVANCE of the assignment due date. Note: The system only supports Microsoft Internet Explorer and Firefox for the time being.
3. Original supporting documentation (e.g. Verification of Student Illness or Injury form, accident report, etc) MUST BE SUBMITTED to the DROP BOX (labeled "Environment and Geography Petition Documentation") located outside Room 3282, Davis Building. Supporting documentation is required within one (1) week of submitting your online request.
4. Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms: Documentation MUST show that the physician was consulted within ONE day of the assignment due date. A statement merely confirming a report of illness made by the student is NOT acceptable (such as, "This patient tells me that he was feeling ill on that day."). Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms can be found on the Office of the Registrar's webpage (http://www.illnessverification.utoronto.ca/getattachment/index/Verification-of-Illness-or-Injury-form-Jan-22-2013.pdf.aspx).

Original supporting documentation (e.g. Verification of Student Illness or Injury form, accident report, etc) MUST BE SUBMITTED to the DROP BOX (labeled "Environment and Geography Petition Documentation") located outside Room 3282, Davis Building. Note: ROSI declarations are not accepted as supporting documentation. You are expected to submit your request to the Department before the due date of the assignment, unless demonstrably serious reasons prevent you from doing so. In the event of an illness, if you are seeking a one-day extension, Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms must confirm that you were ill on the due date of the assignment; if you are requesting a longer extension, your documentation must specify exactly the length of the period during which you were unable to carry out your academic work. For extensions of time beyond the examination period you must submit a petition through the Office of the Registrar. http://www.erin.utoronto.ca/index.php?id=6988

A Departmental committee evaluates each request for an extension of time. Decisions will be communicated by email within two weeks of receipt of all completed documents. Please note that students are required to submit their assignment/lab as soon as they are able and they should NOT wait for the decision of the committee. Note: It is your responsibility to ensure your email account is working and able to receive emails. Claims that a Departmental decision was not received will NOT be considered as a reason for further consideration. Contact Sabrina Ferrari (sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca) Academic Counsellor, should you NOT receive notification of your decision within 2 weeks of submission.

It is your responsibility to follow the appropriate procedures and submit requests for special consideration on time. Failure to do so may result in the committee denying your request.
Should you require further information regarding Special Considerations, please contact the Academic Counselor, Sabrina Ferrari
Undergraduate Academic Counselor
Room 3282, Davis Building, Telephone: 905-828-5465
email: sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca

Equity Statement and Academic Rights

The University of Toronto is committed to equity and respect for diversity. All members of the learning environment in this course should strive to create an atmosphere of mutual respect. As a course instructor, I will neither condone nor tolerate behaviour that undermines the dignity or self-esteem of any individual in this course and wish to be alerted to any attempt to create an intimidating or hostile environment. It is our collective responsibility to create a space that is inclusive and welcomes discussion. Discrimination, harassment and hate speech will not be tolerated. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns you may contact the UTM Equity and Diversity officer at edo.utm@utoronto.ca or the University of Toronto Mississauga Students' Union Vice President Equity at vpequity@utmsu.ca.

Academic Rights

You, as a student at UTM, have the right to:
- Receive a syllabus by the first day of class.
- Rely upon a syllabus once a course is started. An instructor may only change marks' assignments by following the University Assessment and Grading Practices Policy provision 1.3.
- Refuse to use turnitin.com (you must be offered an alternative form of submission).
- Have access to your instructor for consultation during a course or follow up with the department chair if the instructor is unavailable.
- Ask the person who marked your term work for a re-evaluation if you feel it was not fairly graded. You have up to one month from the date of return of the item to inquire about the mark. If you are not satisfied with a re-evaluation, you may appeal to the instructor in charge of the course if the instructor did not mark the work. If your work is remarked, you must accept the resulting mark. You may only appeal a mark beyond the instructor if the term work was worth at least 20% of the course mark.
- Receive at least one significant mark (15% for H courses, 25% for Y courses) before the last day you can drop a course for H courses, and the last day of classes in the first week of January for Y courses taught in the Fall/Winter terms.
- Submit handwritten essays so long as they are neatly written.
- Have no assignment worth 100% of your final grade.
- Not have a term test worth 25% or more in the last two weeks of class.
- Retain intellectual property rights to your research.
- Receive all your assignments once graded.
- View your final exams. To see a final exam, you must submit an online Exam Reproduction Request within 6 months of the exam. There is a small non-refundable fee.
- Privacy of your final grades.
- Arrange for representation from Downtown Legal Services (DLS), a representative from the UTM Students' Union (UTMSU), and/or other forms of support if you are charged with an academic offence.

Expectations/Classroom Behaviour/Behaviour in the Academic Setting

Our expectation of you is that you will show respect to the Course Instructor, TAs, other faculty, staff, and fellow students. This includes arriving on time and staying for the entire class (so you don't disturb others by your late entry or early departure); listening quietly (so you don't disturb others by your chatting or online activities); approaching your course work with an open, honest spirit and enthusiasm; and otherwise adhering to the Code.

In turn, you can expect the Course Instructor, staff, and TAs to show respect to you and your fellow students; to deliver the best course that they possibly can; to communicate their enthusiasm for the material; to maintain fairness in all aspects of course delivery and assessment; and otherwise to adhere to the University's Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters.

Academic Integrity/Honesty or Academic Offenses

It is your responsibility as a student at the University of Toronto to familiarize yourself with, and adhere to, both the Code of Student Conduct and the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters.

This means, first and foremost, that you should read them carefully.

  • The Code of Student Conduct is available from the U of T Mississauga website (Registrar > Academic Calendar > Codes and Policies) or in your print version of the Academic Calendar.

  • The Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters is available from the U of T Mississauga website (Registrar > Academic Calendar > Codes and Policies) or in your print version of the Academic Calendar.

Another helpful document that you should read is How Not to Plagiarize, by M. Procter.

Further Thoughts on Academic Honesty:
The Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters states that:

"The University and its members have a responsibility to ensure that a climate that might encourage, or conditions that might enable, cheating, misrepresentation or unfairness not be tolerated. To this end all must acknowledge that seeking credit or other advantages by fraud or misrepresentation, or seeking to disadvantage others by disruptive behaviour is unacceptable, as is any dishonesty or unfairness in dealing with the work or record of a student." ―University of Toronto Mississauga Academic Calendar

This summarizes what we are all trying to achieve through the implementation of this Code―both students and faculty. We are trying―together―to create an atmosphere of fairness and honesty, in which people can learn and receive appropriate credit for work that they have done. Note that the Code refers specifically to expectations for faculty members, not just for students. It is my responsibility, as a member of the faculty of the University of Toronto, to be familiar with these expectations and adhere to them. There are many additional academic requirements that we are expected to meet with regard to the integrity of course materials, returning of marked work to students, maintenance of student privacy, fairness, grading practices, and others. My TAs and I will make every possible effort to meet these expectations.
 

Accessibility

U of T Mississauga and the AccessAbility Resource Centre are committed to the full participation of students with disabilities in all aspects of campus life. The AccessAbility Resource Centre provides academic accommodations and services to students who have a physical, sensory, or learning disability, mental health condition, acquired brain injury, or chronic health condition, be it visible or hidden. Students who have temporary disabilities (e.g., broken dominant arm) are also eligible to receive services. All interested students must have an intake interview with an advisor to discuss their individual needs.

Students who require accommodation are advised to visit the AccessAbility Resource Centre as early as possible to have their needs assessed, as it may take some time to process the application.

For more information please contact the centre at:
Room 2047, South Bldg.
Tel/TTY: 905-569-4699
E-mail: access.utm@utoronto.ca
Web: www.utm.utoronto.ca/accessability/

Accomodations for Religious Observances

As noted in the the Policy on Scheduling of Classes and Examinations and Other Accommodations for Religious Observances, the following provisions are included:

"It is the policy of the University of Toronto to arrange reasonable accommodation of the needs of students who observe religious holy days other than those already accommodated by ordinary scheduling and statutory holidays.
Students have a responsibility to alert members of the teaching staff in a timely fashion to upcoming religious observances and anticipated absences. Instructors will make every reasonable effort to avoid scheduling tests, examinations or other compulsory activities at these times. If compulsory activities are unavoidable, every reasonable opportunity should be given to these students to make up work that they miss, particularly in courses involving laboratory work. When the scheduling of tests or examinations cannot be avoided, students should be informed of the procedure to be followed to arrange to write at an alternate time.

It is most important that no student be seriously disadvantaged because of her or his religious observances. However, in the scheduling of academic and other activities, it is also important to ensure that the accommodation of one group does not seriously disadvantage other groups within the University community."

With respect to minimum advance notice, the Policy provides that "Students have a responsibility to alert members of the teaching staff in a timely fashion to upcoming religious observances and anticipated absences." Since students would normally be aware of upcoming religious observances as well as examination schedules in advance, a minimum of three weeks advance notice will be considered sufficient.

More information and some dates of potential relevance for the U of T community are available at www.viceprovoststudents.utoronto.ca/publicationsandpolicies/guidelines/religiousobservances.htm.

As with any academic accommodation request, students must submit an on-line Special Consideration Request @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest.

Schedule

Week 1 (January 5): Introduction
Week 2 (January 12): Environmentalism in Historical Perspective
Week 3 (January 19): Economic Growth and the Environment
Week 4 (January 26): Industrialization and the Environment
Week 5 (February 2): Forests through Time (Proposal due)
Week 6 (February 9): Urban Pollution Through Time
Week 7 (February 16): Reading Week
Week 8 (February 23): Industrial Ecology and Eco-Industrial Development
Week 9 (March 2): Institutions and Economic Behaviour
Week 10 (March 9): Guest Lecture: Private Property Rights and Environmental Protection
Week 11(March 16): Geography and Production Activities I
Week 12: (March 23): Geography and Production Activities II  No lecture on that day. The topic and readings will be covered in the following lectures.
Week 13 (March 30): Population / Consumption Growth and the Environment I
Week 14 (April 6): Population / Consumption Growth and the Environment II

Week 1 (January 5): Introduction

Course objectives, format, assignments and evaluation. Brief introduction by each students to his/her background, interests, and reasons for taking the course.
 

Mandatory readings
 

Bailey, Ronald. 2014. "Liberty and the Environment." The New Atlantis (Spring).

Bailey, Ronald. 2008. "Decrying the 'Pursuit of Unnecessary Things' - Are We Overconsuming Our Way to Doomsday?" Reason Online,  February 12.

Basil Utley, Jon. 2010. "Job-Killing Environmentalists." Reason Magazine, November 10.

Ben-Ami, Daniel. 2006. "Who's afraid of economic growth?" Spiked, May 4.

Black, Tim. 2010. "Six-and-a-half billion reasons to be cheerful." Spiked, June 1st.

Collins, Sean. 2010. "Why more really is more." Spiked, June 1st.

Goklany, Indur M. 2007. "On Earth Day, Remember The Humans."  The American, April 22.

Lyons, Rob. 2010. "Down with the doom-mongers!" Spiked, June 1st.

Matson, Pamela. 2009. "The Sustainability Transition." Issues in Science and Technology 25 (4), Summer.

Russell Mead, Walter. 2010. "Save the Planet: Shop Walmart." The American Interest Online, September 14.

Taylor, Matthew. 2008. "Why life is good." New Statesman, 3 January.

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 2 (January 12): Environmentalism in Historical Perspective

Mandatory readings
 

Historical Perspective

Cutcliffe, Stephen H. 2007. Review of The Origins of Modern Environmental Thought. By J. E. de Steiguer. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2006. Environmental History 12 (3).

Osborn, Fairfield. 1948. Our Plundered Planet. Boston: Little, Brown and Company (vi-ix, 3-5, 10-11, 32-38).

Current Perspective

Grunkemeyer, William and Myra Moss. 1999. "Key Concepts in Sustainable Development." The Web Book of Regional Science, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University (Read from "Introduction" to "Traditional and Sustainable Development: Compared and Contrasted" inclusively).

"Oy Vey!" Peter Gordon's blog, January 2, 2008 (read the short text by J. Diamond and Craig Newmark's list).

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 3 (January 19): Economic Growth and the Environment

Mandatory readings
 

Levinson, Arik, Clemen Rasmussen, Karsten Stæhr & Kasper Wrang. 2006. "Framework Paper." Green Roads to Growth Project. Danish Environmental Assessment Institute.

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 4 (January 26): Industrialization and the Environment

Mandatory readings
 

Overview
The World Business Council on Sustainable Development
- on eco-efficiency
- Eco-efficiency module (read pp. 1-40)

Dematerialization
Ausubel, Jesse H., and Paul E. Waggoner. 2008. "Dematerialization: Variety, Caution, and Persistence." PNAS, September 2, vol. 105, no. 35, p. 12774–12779.

Bailey, Ronald. 2014. "Can We Save Nature by Making It Economically Useless?" Reason (November 10).

Cleveland, Cutler J. 2006. "Material intensity of use." Encyclopedia of Earth, November 22.

Rebound Effect
Alcott, Blake, 2005. "Jevons Paradox." Ecological Economics 51 (1): 9-21.

Gottron, Frank. 2001. "RS20981: Energy Efficiency and the Rebound Effect: Does Increasing Efficiency Decrease Demand?" CRS Report for Congress, July 30.

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 5 (February 2): Forests through Time

Mandatory readings

Proposal due

• Overview
Riebeek, Holli. 2008. "Ancient Forest to Modern City." Earth Observatory (February 1st).

Noack, Rick. 2014. "Watch: How Europe is Greener now than 100 Years Ago." Washington Post (December 4). 

Historical Perspective
Avery, Dennis T. 2000. "Earth Day celebrate the gas-powered tractor." The Des Moines Register, April 2.

Libecap, Gary. 2003. "Review of Michael Williams' Deforesting the Earth: From Prehistory to Global Crisis". Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003. EH.NET.

Williams, Michael. 2008. "A New Look at Global Forest Histories of Land Clearing." Annual Review of Environment and Resources, Vol. 33: 345-367.

Current Trends and Debates
Ausubel, Jesse. 2015. Nature Rebounds. Long Now Foundation Seminar (January 13).

Birkett, Terri. 1995. "The Truax."

Kauppi, Pekka E., Jesse H. Ausubel, Jingyun Fang, Alexander S. Mather, Roger A. Sedjo and Paul E. Waggoner. 2006. "Returning Forests Analyzed with the Forest Identity." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 103 (46): 17574-17579.

Matson, Pamela and Peter Vitousek. 2006. "Agricultural Intensification: Will Land Spared from Farming be Land Spared for Nature?" Conservation Biology 20 (3): 709 - 710.

Parviainen, Liisa. 2006. "UH: End of Deforestation in View? Experts Advance New Way to Size Up Global Forest Resources." University of Helsinki (University Communications), November 14th.

Ridley, Matt. 2011. "Eating Your Greenery—And Having It, Too." The Wall Street Journal, July 2.

Rosenthal, Elizabeth. 2009. "New Jungles Prompt a Debate on Rain Forests." The New York Times, Januray 29.

Ridley, Matt. 2013. "The Greening of the Planet." RationalOptimist.com (January 5). 

Harrabin, Roger. 2016. "Rise in CO2 has 'greened Planet Earth." BBC News (April 25). 

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 6 (February 9): Urban Pollution through Time

Mandatory readings

Larsen, Bjorn et al. 2008. "Copenhagen Consensus 2008 Challenge Paper: Air Pollution." Copenhagen Consensus Center.

Lowitz, Melissa (Lead Author); Cutler J. Cleveland (Contributing Author); Brian Black (Topic Editor). 2007. "Donora, Pennsylvania." In: Encyclopedia of Earth. Eds. Cutler J. Cleveland (Washington, D. C.: Environmental Information Coalition, National Council for Science and the Environment). [First published in the Encyclopedia of Earth September 21, 2006; Last revised June 14, 2007].

Shah, Jitendru. 2008. "Perspective Paper." Copenhagen Consensus Center.

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 7 / Reading Week (February 16)

 

Week 8 (February 23): Industrial Ecology and Eco-Industrial Development

Mandatory readings
 

Society for Industrial Ecology. A History of Industrial Ecology

Chertow, M. R. 2000. "Industrial Symbiosis: Literature and Taxonomy." Annual Review of Energy and Environment 25: 313-337.

Playfair, L. 1892. "Waste Products Made Useful," North American Review CLV (432): 560-568.

Desrochers, Pierre. 2004. "Industrial Symbiosis: The Case for Market Coordination." Journal of Cleaner Production 12 (8-10): 1099-1110.

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 9 (March 2): Institutions and Innovative Behavior

Mandatory readings
 

Danish Environmental Assessment Institute. 2005. Environmentally Harmful Subsidies. Linkages between subsidies, the environment and the economy. (Chapters 1-3)

Fossedal, Greg, and John Shanahan. 1998. "Virginia’s Free-Market Environmentalist." Hoover Institution, Policy Review, no. 87, January 1st.

Meiners, Roger E. and Bruce Yandle. 1998. The Common Law: How it Protects the Environment. PERC Policy Series PS-13.

Swift, Byron. 2000. How Environmental Laws Can Discourage Pollution Prevention. Case Studies of Barriers to Innovation. Progressive Policy Institute.

Yandle, Bruce. 2004. "Environmental Turning Points, Institutions, and the Race to the Top." Independent Review 9 (2): 211-226.

Suggested readings
 

Week 10 (March 9): Guest Lecture: Private Property Rights and Environmental Protection

> Guest speaker: Elizabeth Brubaker, EnvironmentProbe
 

Mandatory readings
 

Brubaker, Elizabeth. 1995. Property Rights in the Defence of Nature. Earthscan Publications Limited, Ch 1, 2, 4 and 6.

Addendum to the lecture

Week 11 (March 16): Geography and Production Activities I

Mandatory readings

Please note that the content week 11 and 12 have been inverted. You are nonetheless free to hand in your comments on the assigned readings of week 12 at the beginning of week 11 if you have already written them. You will also be able to hand in your comments on the mandatory readings of week 11 at the beginning of lecture 13.

Desrochers, Pierre and Hiroko Shimizu. 2008. "Yes We Have No Bananas: A Critique of the Food Mile Perspective." Mercatus Policy Series, Policy Primer No. 8, October.

Garnett, Tara. 2008. "Cooking Up a Storm: Summary." Food Climate Research Network, September (Full study available here).

Halweil, Brian. 2002. "Home Grown: The Case for Local Food in a Global Market." Washington: Worldwatch Institute (pdf version).

Kwok, Roberta. 2008. "Is local food really miles better?" Salon, June 24.

McWilliams, James E. 2009. "'Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly'." The Wall Street Journal, August 22.

Sexton, Steven. 2009. "Does Local Production Improve Environmental and Health Outcomes?" ARE Update, 13(2): 5-8.

Stacey, Caroline. 2008. "Food miles." Food Matters, BBC News.

Hellmann's Eat Real Eat Local

Suggested links
 

Week 12 (March 23): Geography and Production Activities II

No lecture on that day. The topic and readings will be covered in the following lectures.

VIDEO
 

"Thanksgiving (and daily) Food Miles." 365 Days Of Trash, November 17, 2008.

Mandatory readings
 

Cities and Sustainability

Bailey, Ronald. 2006. "The Lingering Stench of Malthus - Debunking Jeremy Rifkin's Beef With Cities." ReasonOnline, December 22.

Cherry, Steven. 2013. "Want to Save the Environment? Build More Cities. A new book argues for the environmental advantages of urban density." IEEE Spectrum (May 7).

Glaeser, Edward L. 2009. "Green Cities, Brown Suburbs." City Journal, vol. 19, no 1.

Huber, Peter W. and Mark P. Mills. 2000. "How Cities Green the Planet." City Journal (Winter).

Hyla, Adam. 2009. "Our destiny is density." Real Change News, vol. 16, no. 43, September 30.

Kahn, Matthew E. 2006. "Chapter 1: Introduction." Green Cities - Urban Growth and the Environment, Brookings Institution Press, 160pp.

Kunzig, Robert. 2011. "The City Solution - Why cities are the best cure for our planet's growing pains." National Geographic Magazine (December).

Rifkin, Jeremy. 2006. "The Risks of Too Much City." The Washington Post, December 17.

Simon, David. 2008. "Urban Environments: Issues on the Peri-Urban Fringe." Annual Review of Environment and Resources 33: 167-185.

The Pollution Haven Hypothesis

Levinson, Arik. 2008. "Pollution Haven Hypothesis." New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd edition.

Suggested readings
 

Week 13 (March 30): Population / Consumption Growth and the Environment I

Mandatory readings
 

Wackernagel, Mathis, Niels B. Schulz, Diana Deumling, Alejandro Callejas Linares, Martin Jenkins, Valerie Kapos, Chad Monfreda, Jonathan Loh, Norman Myers, Richard Norgaard, & Jørgen Randers. 2002. "Tracking the Ecological Overshoot of the Human Economy." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), June 27.

Eschenbach, Willis. 2010. "Ecological Footprints – a good idea gone bad." Watts Up With That?, August 26.

Jørgensen, A. et al. 2002. "Assessing the Ecological Footprint: A Look at the WWF's Living Planet 2002 Report." Environmental Assessment Institute.

Goklany, Indur and Anthony Trewavas. 2003. "How Technology Can Reduce our Impact on the Earth," Nature 423: 115.

"Ecological Footprint: Overview." Global Footprint Network, 2006.

Suggested readings and links
 

Week 14 (April 6): Population / Consumption Growth and the Environment II

> Guest speaker: Andrew C. McKinley, Senior Associate, Sustainable Business Solutions, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
 

Mandatory readings
 

> We will watch the Intelligence2 debate on "Major reductions in carbon emissions are not worth the money."

Executive summary of Yohe, Gary et al. 2008. Copenhagen Consensus 2008 Challenge Paper: Global Warming on the Copenhagen Consensus Center website.

Kratkraemer, Jeffrey A. 2005. "Economics of Natural Resource Scarcity: The State of the Debate." Resources for the Future, Discussion Paper 05-14.

Goklany, Indur. 2008. "What to Do about Climate Change." Policy Analysis, Cato Institute, No. 609, February 5.

Suggested readings
 

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