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University of Toronto Mississauga
Department of Geography • Spring 2017

GGR 209H5F Economic Geography

 

Instructor: Pierre Desrochers

 

 Lectures: Tuesday 15:00-17:00

 

 Phone: (905) 828-5206

Office: Davis Building, room 3273

 

 Lecture room: IB 150

 

 E-mail: pierre.desrochers@utoronto.ca

 

DIRECT LINKS


>
Course Description
>
Course Objectives
>
Texts
> Assignments
> Contacting the Instructor
> Tests
> Term Paper
> Department of Geography Late Assignment/Missed Test Policy
> Equity Statement and Academic Rights
>
Expectations/Classroom Behaviour/Behaviour in the Academic Setting
> Academic Integrity/Honesty or Academic Offenses
> Accessibility
> Accommodations for Religious Observances
> Supplementary readings
>
Lecture Schedule


>
Lecture 1 (Jan. 3): Introduction
> Lectures 2 and 3 (Jan. 10 and 17): Markets in Place, Space and Time
> Lectures 4 and 5 (Jan. 24 and 31): Business and Labour
> Lecture 6 (Feb. 7): Term Test Questions
> Lecture 7 (Feb. 14): Government and NGOs
> Lecture 8 (Feb. 28): Cities
> Lecture 9 (March 7): Energy and Mineral Resources
> Lecture 10 (March 14): Agriculture
> Lecture 11 (March 21): Manufacturing, Services
> Lecture 12 (March 28): Transportation and Communication Networks, Consumption

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

An introduction to the interaction of the economic, social and political institutions that determine the quality of life in a particular place. Subjects covered range from economic efficiency and social equity to the location dynamics of value chains. The emphasis of the course is on Canadian examples.
 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The course has five main objectives:


1) To introduce you to the study of economic activity in place and across space;
2) To help you understand the interaction of economic, social and political institutions that determine the quality of life in a particular place;
3) To improve your ability to critically analyse and write clearly on a number of issues;
4) To memorize and use, without aids, the basic terminology with which professionals in relevant disciplines communicate their work and their research findings;
5) To apply a wide range of academic skills in active listening, note-taking, studying, reading, and test-taking to upper-level university courses.
 

TEXTS

The main text for the course is Roger Hayter and Jerry Patchell's Economic Geography: An Institutional Approach, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, 2016.

Most of the suggested readings are freely accessible from anywhere. Some of them, however, may require you to use a UofT terminal or user code.
 

 ASSIGNMENTS

% OF GRADE

DATE DUE

1) Proposal for Review Essay
2) Term Test
3) Review Essay
4) Final Exam
 

5%
20%
40%
35%
 

January 24
February 7
March 28, 5PM
Sat. Apr. 8th 9-11 am RAWC Gym C
Final Exam Schedule
 

As per the University Grading Practices Policy, please note that "after the methods of evaluation have been made known, the instructor may not change them or their relative weight without the consent of at least a simple majority of the students enrolled in the course. Any changes shall be reported to the division or the department."

How to Query or Challenge a Mark

Please note that you have two weeks from the date an item is returned in class to ask for the item to be remarked. Contact the Course Instructor for all queries about course marks, or if you wish to challenge a mark. Absolutely no item will be remarked after the two-week period has passed. Material submitted for remarking must be accompanied by a brief written explanation detailing your reasons for dissatisfaction with the original mark (such as an addition error or something you think the marker may have missed). A request for a remark without a written explanation will not be acted upon.

Please note that you are allowed two questions where you and the instructor can agree to disagree (meaning you believe that you are entitled to a higher mark, but your instructor disagrees) without penalty. Beginning with the third question where you and your instructor disagree, one point will be taken off your final mark by question for which a revised mark was requested by you and denied by the instructor.
 

CONTACTING THE INSTRUCTOR

My office hours are Tuesday 5-6:30PM or by appointment. You can contact me at pierre.desrochers@utoronto.ca.

Please read the course syllabus before e-mailing a question or expect a one line answer telling you to look it up if the answer is already there.

Always use your University of Toronto e-mail address (@utoronto.ca) for all course-related communications. E-mails from other domains (e.g., hotmail, Rogers, gmail, yahoo, etc.) may be filtered as spam and will at any rate be ignored. Always include the course code (e.g., GGR209) as part of your subject line, along with your full name and student number in the body of the e-mail. E-mails will be answered during office hours as promptly as possible. Please note that I do not open attachments and will not answer during week-ends.

The first person that you should e-mail concerning department- or program-related queries or to submit documentation regarding a missed assignment, quiz, or test is the Academic Counsellor for Geography/Environment, Sabrina Ferrari (sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca).

E-mail should NOT be viewed as an alternative to meeting with the TA or professor during office hours. Nor should e-mail be used as a mechanism to receive private tutorials (especially prior to tests) or to explain material that was covered in missed lectures. Not receiving replies to e-mails from the TA or professor, or not receiving them in time, will not be an acceptable excuse for pleas for extensions to assignment or exam deadlines.

Students are advised to consult www.enough.utoronto.ca for information on university policy concerning the appropriate use of information and communication technology.

© PhD Comics
 

Tests

A set of questions will be given in advance. Students will be asked to answer a number of these during the test. Note that Power Point slides presented during the lectures WILL NOT be posted online. No documentation is allowed during the tests. UTM Exam Schedule

Questions
 

Term Paper

Students will be asked to write a 15 page review essay of a book dealing with topics covered in class. The choice of book must be approved by the instructor. Papers should follow one of the Standard Documentation Formats.

The papers are due by Tuesday, March 28, 5 PM. There will be a drop-off box in front of Room Davis 3284.


Here are the instructions to write your review essay.

On the Art of Writing a Term Paper
Writing http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/ and Advice on Academic Writing http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice at the University of Toronto.

Some additional advice from Professor Daniel Drezner (On writing a paper / On researching a paper) and Professor Steven Horwitz (Guide to Writing Formal Academic Papers).

Other useful links: UTM Library / Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre.
 

Your choice of topic or book must be approved by the instructor before turning in your proposal. Those of you who would like to submit a book suggestion are asked to provide a link to the publisher's webpage devoted to the book or, if no such thing exists, to the Amazon or another large bookseller webpage devoted to the book.

Please note that you do not need to submit your proposal or the appendixes of your term paper through turnitin.com.


Note Concerning Turnitin

Normally, students will be required to submit written assignments to Turnitin.com for a review of textual similarity and detection of possible plagiarism. In doing so, students will allow their assignments to be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com reference database, where they will be used solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. The terms that apply to the University's use of the Turnitin.com service are described on the Turnitin.com web site (www.Turnitin.com). If you have an objection to the use of Turnitin for the submission of your work, please make an appointment to speak personally with the Course Instructor to discuss alternative arrangements. A guide for students is available from the University of Toronto's Office of Teaching Advancement, at: www.utoronto.ca/ota/turnitin/TurnitinGuideForStudents.pdf. This information will also be made available on the course Blackboard site.

Please note that submitting your paper through Turnitin.com or making alternative arrangements before the deadline with your professor is not optional. Failure to do so will result in a grade of 0 for your term paper. Failure to submit your paper on turnitin.com before the deadline will result in the same late penalty as if you had not submitted your hard copy.

You are required to submit a hard copy of the assignment as instructed in the syllabus for the TAs to grade and annotate Electronic copies will be submitted by students through Turnitin.

> Basic steps for setting up your Turnitin account and submitting papers

Turnitin.com course ID: 13427412 (The password will be given in class and via e-mail.)
 

Department of Geography Late assignment/Missed Test Policy

This is the departmental policy for late assignments and missed tests. Please note that the penalty related to your proposal is different. In this particular case, I apply my own policy as specified on the syllabus.

I
n-class or Online QUIZ/TESTS: Students CANNOT petition to re-write a quiz/test once the test has begun. If you are feeling ill, please do not start the online or in-class test and seek medical attention immediately. You must have a physician fill out a U of T Student Medical Certificate and submit a request via the online Special Consideration Request form @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest within 24 hours.

Online Submissions for Term Work: It is every student’s responsibility to ensure that their online submission is submitted successfully by the due date. Accommodations will not be made for unsuccessful submissions due to, but not limited to, i) the system timing out ii) submitting the incorrect document(s) iii) poor internet connection / no internet connection etc.

Missed Term Work (Assignment/Lab - as per Department of Geography policy):
Late assignments will be subject to a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) of the total marks for the assignment. Assignments submitted five calendar days beyond the due date will be assigned a grade of zero.

Academic accommodation can be made when an assignment is late. For accommodations on late/missed assignments please see section on "Extension of Time".

Missed Term Work (Quiz/Test - as per Department of Geography policy):
In courses with final exams, there will be no re-writes or make-ups for term tests/quizzes missed for University-accepted, verifiable reasons. Instead, the final exam will be re-weighted by the value of the term test/quiz.

Requesting Academic Accommodation using the Online Special Consideration Request Application: In Geography and Environment courses, professors cannot grant extensions on term work or allow makeups for missed items. If you ask for and receive an extension or a makeup date directly from a professor, without following the appropriate steps as outlined in this document, it will be invalid and may be revoked at any time by the departmental petitions committee.

Informing Your Professor and Submitting Appropriate Documentation:
The following steps must be completed in order to be considered for academic accommodation for any course work such as missed tests or late assignments:

1. Students must inform their professor in writing (e-mail is acceptable) within 24 hours of a test date/assignment due date of any circumstances that prevent them from writing a test or submitting an assignment on time.
2. Students must complete an online Special Consideration Request @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest. Students who miss a test due to circumstances beyond their control (e.g. illness or an accident) can request that the Department grant them special consideration. You must inform your instructor within 24 hours and you have up to one (1) week from the date of the missed test to submit your online request (late requests will NOT be considered without a "letter of explanation" as to why the request is late). You must present your case to the Department (not the Instructor). Note: The system only supports Microsoft Internet Explorer and Firefox for the time being.
3. Original supporting documentation (e.g. Verification of Student Illness or Injury form, accident report, etc) MUST BE SUBMITTED to the DROP BOX (labeled "Environment and Geography Petition Documentation") located outside Room 3282, Davis Building. Supporting documentation is required within 48 hours of submitting your online request.
Please Note: If you missed your test for a reason connected to your registered disability, please be advised that the department will accept documentation supplied by the UTM AccessAbility Resource Centre.
Note: (i) ROSI declarations are not accepted as supporting documentation.
(ii) If your reason for absence is due to a last minute flight due to a family emergency (illness/death etc.) you must provide your flight itinerary INCLUDING the date the flight was purchased as well as boarding passes in addition to proof of death/illness/accident.
4. Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms MUST include the statement "This Student was unable to write the test on date(s) for medical reasons". Documentation MUST show that the physician was consulted within ONE day of the test date. A statement merely confirming a report of illness made by the student is NOT acceptable (such as, "This patient tells me that he was feeling ill on that day."). Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms can be found on the Office of the Registrar's webpage (http://www.illnessverification.utoronto.ca/getattachment/index/Verification-of-Illness-or-Injury-form-Jan-22-2013.pdf.aspx).

Please complete the following:
- Special request link: https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest
- Verification of Illness form: http://www.illnessverification.utoronto.ca/

Please note that the written explanation and documentation that you submit represents an appeal from you, requesting the opportunity to account for that portion of your grade in some other manner. If an appeal is not received, or if the appeal is deemed unacceptable, you will receive a grade of zero for the item you missed. If the appeal is granted - that is, your reason for missing the item is considered acceptable by the committee - then a mechanism for accounting for the grade value of the missed item will be discussed.

A Departmental committee evaluates each request. Decisions will be communicated by email within two weeks of receipt of all completed documents. Note: It is your responsibility to ensure your email account is working and able to receive emails. Claims that a Departmental decision was not received will NOT be considered as a reason for further consideration. Contact Sabrina Ferrari (sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca) Academic Counselor, should you NOT receive notification of your decision within 2 weeks of submission.

Note that holidays and pre-purchased plane tickets, family plans, your friend's wedding, lack of preparation, or too many other tests are not acceptable excuses for missing a quiz, a test, or an item of term work.

Extension of Time
Students are expected to back up their work at all times. As such, extension requests due to computer issues (stolen, crashed, damaged etc.) will not be considered. The following steps must be completed in order to be considered for academic accommodation for any assignment extensions. Assignments handed in AFTER the work has been returned to the class cannot be marked for credit.

1. Students must inform their professor in writing (e-mail is acceptable) IN ADVANCE of an assignment due date of any circumstances that prevent them from submitting their assignment on time.
2. Students must complete an online Special Consideration Request @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest IN ADVANCE of the assignment due date. Note: The system only supports Microsoft Internet Explorer and Firefox for the time being.
3. Original supporting documentation (e.g. Verification of Student Illness or Injury form, accident report, etc) MUST BE SUBMITTED to the DROP BOX (labeled "Environment and Geography Petition Documentation") located outside Room 3282, Davis Building. Supporting documentation is required within one (1) week of submitting your online request.
4. Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms: Documentation MUST show that the physician was consulted within ONE day of the assignment due date. A statement merely confirming a report of illness made by the student is NOT acceptable (such as, "This patient tells me that he was feeling ill on that day."). Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms can be found on the Office of the Registrar's webpage (http://www.illnessverification.utoronto.ca/getattachment/index/Verification-of-Illness-or-Injury-form-Jan-22-2013.pdf.aspx).

Original supporting documentation (e.g. Verification of Student Illness or Injury form, accident report, etc) MUST BE SUBMITTED to the DROP BOX (labeled "Environment and Geography Petition Documentation") located outside Room 3282, Davis Building. Note: ROSI declarations are not accepted as supporting documentation. You are expected to submit your request to the Department before the due date of the assignment, unless demonstrably serious reasons prevent you from doing so. In the event of an illness, if you are seeking a one-day extension, Verification of Student Illness or Injury forms must confirm that you were ill on the due date of the assignment; if you are requesting a longer extension, your documentation must specify exactly the length of the period during which you were unable to carry out your academic work. For extensions of time beyond the examination period you must submit a petition through the Office of the Registrar. http://www.erin.utoronto.ca/index.php?id=6988

A Departmental committee evaluates each request for an extension of time. Decisions will be communicated by email within two weeks of receipt of all completed documents. Please note that students are required to submit their assignment/lab as soon as they are able and they should NOT wait for the decision of the committee. Note: It is your responsibility to ensure your email account is working and able to receive emails. Claims that a Departmental decision was not received will NOT be considered as a reason for further consideration. Contact Sabrina Ferrari (sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca) Academic Counsellor, should you NOT receive notification of your decision within 2 weeks of submission.

It is your responsibility to follow the appropriate procedures and submit requests for special consideration on time. Failure to do so may result in the committee denying your request.
Should you require further information regarding Special Considerations, please contact the Academic Counselor, Sabrina Ferrari
Undergraduate Academic Counselor
Room 3282, Davis Building, Telephone: 905-828-5465
email: sabrina.ferrari@utoronto.ca
 

Equity Statement and Academic Rights

The University of Toronto is committed to equity and respect for diversity. All members of the learning environment in this course should strive to create an atmosphere of mutual respect. As a course instructor, I will neither condone nor tolerate behaviour that undermines the dignity or self-esteem of any individual in this course and wish to be alerted to any attempt to create an intimidating or hostile environment. It is our collective responsibility to create a space that is inclusive and welcomes discussion. Discrimination, harassment and hate speech will not be tolerated. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns you may contact the UTM Equity and Diversity officer at edo.utm@utoronto.ca or the University of Toronto Mississauga Students' Union Vice President Equity at vpequity@utmsu.ca.

Academic Rights

You, as a student at UTM, have the right to:
- Receive a syllabus by the first day of class.
- Rely upon a syllabus once a course is started. An instructor may only change marks' assignments by following the University Assessment
  and Grading Practices Policy provision 1.3.
- Refuse to use turnitin.com (you must be offered an alternative form of submission).
- Have access to your instructor for consultation during a course or follow up with the department chair if the instructor is unavailable.
- Ask the person who marked your term work for a re-evaluation if you feel it was not fairly graded. You have up to one month from the date of
  return of the item to inquire about the mark. If you are not satisfied with a re-evaluation, you may appeal to the instructor in charge of the
  course if the instructor did not mark the work. If your work is remarked, you must accept the resulting mark. You may only appeal a mark
  beyond the instructor if the term work was worth at least 20% of the course mark.
- Receive at least one significant mark (15% for H courses, 25% for Y courses) before the last day you can drop a course for H courses, and
  the last day of classes in the first week of January for Y courses taught in the Fall/Winter terms.
- Submit handwritten essays so long as they are neatly written.
- Have no assignment worth 100% of your final grade.
- Not have a term test worth 25% or more in the last two weeks of class.
- Retain intellectual property rights to your research.
- Receive all your assignments once graded.
- View your final exams. To see a final exam, you must submit an online Exam Reproduction Request within 6 months of the exam. There is a
  small non-refundable fee.
- Privacy of your final grades.
- Arrange for representation from Downtown Legal Services (DLS), a representative from the UTM Students' Union (UTMSU), and/or other
  forms of support if you are charged with an academic offence.

Expectations/Classroom Behaviour/Behaviour in the Academic Setting

Our expectation of you is that you will show respect to the Course Instructor, TAs, other faculty, staff, and fellow students. This includes arriving on time and staying for the entire class (so you don't disturb others by your late entry or early departure); listening quietly (so you don't disturb others by your chatting or online activities); approaching your course work with an open, honest spirit and enthusiasm; and otherwise adhering to the Code.

In turn, you can expect the Course Instructor, staff, and TAs to show respect to you and your fellow students; to deliver the best course that they possibly can; to communicate their enthusiasm for the material; to maintain fairness in all aspects of course delivery and assessment; and otherwise to adhere to the University's Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters.

Academic Integrity/Honesty or Academic Offenses

It is your responsibility as a student at the University of Toronto to familiarize yourself with, and adhere to, both the Code of Student Conduct and the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters.

This means, first and foremost, that you should read them carefully.

  • The Code of Student Conduct is available from the U of T Mississauga website (Registrar > Academic Calendar > Codes and Policies) or in your print version of the Academic Calendar.

  • The Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters is available from the U of T Mississauga website (Registrar > Academic Calendar > Codes and Policies) or in your print version of the Academic Calendar.

Another helpful document that you should read is How Not to Plagiarize, by M. Procter.

Further Thoughts on Academic Honesty:
The Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters states that:

"The University and its members have a responsibility to ensure that a climate that might encourage, or conditions that might enable, cheating, misrepresentation or unfairness not be tolerated. To this end all must acknowledge that seeking credit or other advantages by fraud or misrepresentation, or seeking to disadvantage others by disruptive behaviour is unacceptable, as is any dishonesty or unfairness in dealing with the work or record of a student." ―University of Toronto Mississauga Academic Calendar

This summarizes what we are all trying to achieve through the implementation of this Code―both students and faculty. We are trying―together―to create an atmosphere of fairness and honesty, in which people can learn and receive appropriate credit for work that they have done. Note that the Code refers specifically to expectations for faculty members, not just for students. It is my responsibility, as a member of the faculty of the University of Toronto, to be familiar with these expectations and adhere to them. There are many additional academic requirements that we are expected to meet with regard to the integrity of course materials, returning of marked work to students, maintenance of student privacy, fairness, grading practices, and others. My TAs and I will make every possible effort to meet these expectations.
 

Accessibility

U of T Mississauga and the AccessAbility Resource Centre are committed to the full participation of students with disabilities in all aspects of campus life. The AccessAbility Resource Centre provides academic accommodations and services to students who have a physical, sensory, or learning disability, mental health condition, acquired brain injury, or chronic health condition, be it visible or hidden. Students who have temporary disabilities (e.g., broken dominant arm) are also eligible to receive services. All interested students must have an intake interview with an advisor to discuss their individual needs.

Students who require accommodation are advised to visit the AccessAbility Resource Centre as early as possible to have their needs assessed, as it may take some time to process the application.

For more information please contact the centre at:
Room 2047, South Bldg.
Tel/TTY: 905-569-4699
E-mail: access.utm@utoronto.ca
Web: www.utm.utoronto.ca/accessability/

Accomodations for Religious Observances

As noted in the the Policy on Scheduling of Classes and Examinations and Other Accommodations for Religious Observances, the following provisions are included:

"It is the policy of the University of Toronto to arrange reasonable accommodation of the needs of students who observe religious holy days other than those already accommodated by ordinary scheduling and statutory holidays.
Students have a responsibility to alert members of the teaching staff in a timely fashion to upcoming religious observances and anticipated absences. Instructors will make every reasonable effort to avoid scheduling tests, examinations or other compulsory activities at these times. If compulsory activities are unavoidable, every reasonable opportunity should be given to these students to make up work that they miss, particularly in courses involving laboratory work. When the scheduling of tests or examinations cannot be avoided, students should be informed of the procedure to be followed to arrange to write at an alternate time.

It is most important that no student be seriously disadvantaged because of her or his religious observances. However, in the scheduling of academic and other activities, it is also important to ensure that the accommodation of one group does not seriously disadvantage other groups within the University community."

With respect to minimum advance notice, the Policy provides that "Students have a responsibility to alert members of the teaching staff in a timely fashion to upcoming religious observances and anticipated absences." Since students would normally be aware of upcoming religious observances as well as examination schedules in advance, a minimum of three weeks advance notice will be considered sufficient.

More information and some dates of potential relevance for the U of T community are available at www.viceprovoststudents.utoronto.ca/publicationsandpolicies/guidelines/religiousobservances.htm.

As with any academic accommodation request, students must submit an on-line Special Consideration Request @ https://utmapp.utm.utoronto.ca/SpecialRequest.

Supplementary readings

Economic geography is a long-established subfield of the discipline of geography that studies the location, distribution and spatial organization of economic activities. As such, it overlaps with the subfield of urban economics and the interdisciplinary project known as regional science.

A few freely available overviews of the questions discussed by economic geographers (include several classic texts)

Regional Research Institute (West Virginia University). The Web Book of Regional Science (RRI).

Nallari, Raj, Breda Griffith and Shahid Yusuf. 2012. Geography of Growth : Spatial Economics and Competitiveness. Washington, D.C.: World Bank.

Human Geography: Economic Geography (Dartmouth College Library).

LECTURE SCHEDULE

Lecture 1 (Jan. 3): Introduction
Lectures 2 and 3 (Jan. 10 and 17): Markets in Place, Space and Time
Lectures 4 and 5 (Jan. 24 and 31): Business and Labour (Jan. 24: Deadline for book review proposal)
Lecture 6 (Feb. 7): Term Test  Questions
Lecture 7 (Feb. 14): Government and NGOs
Reading Week (Feb. 21)
Lecture 8 (Feb. 28): Cities
Lecture 9 (March 7): Energy and Mineral Resources
Lecture 10 (March 14): Agriculture
Lecture 11 (March 21): Manufacturing, Services
Lecture 12 (March 28): Transportation and Communication Networks, Consumption
Deadline for review essay (March 28, 5PM): UTM Geography Department Drop Box
Final Exam - Sat. Apr. 8th 9-11 am RAWC Gym C
 

Lecture 1 (Jan 3): Introduction

Mandatory Video
 

Hans Rosling's 200 Countries, 200 Years, 4 Minutes - The Joy of Stats - BBC Four.
 

Mandatory readings
 

 

- Economic Geography
Hayter and Patchell, Introduction

Poon, Jessie P. H. 2015. "Economic Geography" Oxford Bibliographies.

Swanson, Ana. 2016. "Six Maps that will make you Rethink the World." Washington Post (April 29).

- State of the World (Pessimists)
Hickel, Jason. 2014. "Exposing the Great 'Poverty Reduction' Lie." Al Jazeera (August 21).

Oxfam International. 2017. "Just 8 Men Own Same wealth as Half the World." (January 16). 

- State of the World (Optimists)
Roser, Max. 2016. "World Poverty." Our World in Data.

Horwitz, Steven. 2015. "The Nightmare of Living in the Past." Fee.org (October 20).

Norberg, Johan. 2016. "And the Poor Shall Rise." Spiked Review (December).
 
Lomborg, Bjψrn. 2017. "Oxfam's Upside Down Inequality Study." USA Today (January 17). 
 

Suggested reading
 

LectureS 2 & 3 (Jan 10 & 17): Markets in Place, Space & Time

Mandatory Videos
 

Guest lecture / January 10: UTM Geography, GIS and Data librarian Andrew Nicholson

W. P. Carey School of Business (Arizona State University). 2010. "What is Supply Chain Management."

Learn Liberty. 2011. Tragedy of the Commons 

Learn Liberty. 2011. Negative Externalities and the Coase Theorem 

Boudreaux, Don. 2012. MR University Principles of Economics: Microeconomics - Division of labor.
 
Boudreaux, Don. 2012. MR University Principles of Economics: Microeconomics - Comparative Advantage.

TED Talks. 2010. Hans Rosling: The Magic Washing Machine.

Liberty Pen. 2012. The Tragedy of the Commons (John Stossel).

Boudreaux, Don. 2015. "An Orgy of Innovation." Marginal Revolution University.
 

Mandatory readings
 

 

Hayter and Patchell, chapters 1-3

Liebowitz, Stan and & Stephen E. Margolis. 1996. "Typing Errors." Reason (June).

 

LectureS 4 & 5 (Jan 24 & 31): Business and Labour

Mandatory Videos
 

Note: January 24 Deadline for submitting book review proposal (beginning of class)

-Business
Smithsonian Channel. 2012. "Silicon Valley's Traitorous Eight." 

-Labour
FEE Seminars. 2012. The Truth about the Minimum Wage (November 19).

ABC News. 2012. "Apple's Chinese Factories: Exclusive." (February 21).

ABC News. 2012. "Inside Apple: Changes Made at Foxconn." (March 29).

New York Times. 2012. "The iEconomy: Factory Upgrade - Apple News 2012." (December 27).

Reuters. 2011. "British Riots Highlight the Youth Unemployment Challenge." (August 12).

Learn Liberty. 2014. Make Progress, Not Work (Econ Chronicles: Bryan Caplan) (May 6).

Rowe, Mike. 2016. "Don't Follow your Passion." Praeger University. 
 

Mandatory readings
 

Hayter and Patchell, chapters 4-5
 

Lecture 6 (Feb. 7): Term Test


Questions
 

LECTURE 7 (FEB. 14): Government and NGOs

Mandatory VideoS
 

Rosenberg, Jennifer. "The Berlin Wall : A Symbol of the Cold War." About.com. 

Margaret Thatcher on social inequality and socialism (last intervention at the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, November 22, 1990).

Kerr, Stacey. 2015. Three Minute Theory: What is Neoliberalism?

Ron Swanson Educates a Young Individual on Government (excerpts from season 3, episode 14 of Parks and Recreation)

Ron Swanson on Capitalism
 

Mandatory readings
 

Hayter and Patchell, chapters 6-7
 

Lecture 8 (Feb. 28): Cities

Mandatory readings
 

Hayter and Patchell, chapter 8

Kusisto, Laura. 2016. "Why the Great Divide Is Growing Between Affordable and Expensive U.S. Cities." Wall Street Journal (April 18).
 
Green, Kenneth P. et al. 2016. "Local Governments in GTA have Tools to Increase Housing Supply, Affordability." Fraser Forum (April 18). 

---. 2016. "City of the Century: How Vienna Produced Ideas that Shaped the West." The Economist (December 24).

Dekker, Erwin. 2016. "How Viennese Culture Shaped Austrian Economics." Fee.org (July 31). 

Eisen, Ben, Steve Lafleur and Josef Filipowicz. 2017. "Rent Control-Proof Bad Policy Ideas Die Hard." Toronto Sun, March 22. 
 

Lecture 9 (March 7): Energy and Mineral Resources

Mandatory VideoS
 

Suzuki, David. 2010. "David Suzuki Speaks on Overpopulation."

Horwitz, Steven. 2011. "Are We Running out of Resources?" Learn Liberty.
 

Mandatory readings
 

Hayter and Patchell, chapter 9

Suzuki, David. 2011. "Is Seven Billion People too Many?" David Suzuki Foundation (November 3).

Desrochers, Pierre and Vincent Geloso. 2015. "No Limits to Growth." National Post (Financial Post) (September 29).
 

Lecture 10 (March 14): Agriculture

Mandatory Video
 

Quirk, Mary Beth. 2015. "Guy Spends 6 Months, $1,500 To Make A Sandwich Entirely From Scratch." Consumerist (September 16). 
 

Mandatory readings
 

Hayter and Patchell, chapter 10

The Canadian Encyclopedia. "Crops."

"Costa del Polythene: a sea of plastic." Barcelona Field Studies Centre.

Cleveland, David. A. 2011. "Localization - Necessary, But Not Sufficient." Huffington Post (July 31).

Desrochers, Pierre. 2014. "On the Pitfalls of Urban Food Production." New Geography (September 6). 
 

Lecture 11 (March 21): Manufacturing, Services

Mandatory VideoS
 

History Channel. Henry Ford Videos - The Invention of the Automobile.

Model T Assembly Line

TV Choice Films - Inside a Factory VI: The Global Car.

Penske Logistics. 2012. Penske Logistics and Ford Motor Company's European Supply Chain Case Study.

White, Jordan. 2015. Central Place Theory Rap.

CBC Archives. End of Eaton's (The National, 1999).
 

Mandatory readings
 

Hayter and Patchell, chapter 11-12

Ford, Martin. 2015. "The Rise of the Robots: Is this Time Different?" Big Ideas & Innovation (December 5).

Smil, Vaclav. 2016. "Manufacturing Powers." IEEE Spectrum (April) : 25.

Tombe, Trevor. 2016. "The Danger of 'Value Added" Mythologies." C2C (January 4).

Plumer, Brad. 2016. "This is an Incredible Visualization of the World's Shipping Routes (Updated)." Vox (August 6).
 
Ehrenfreund, Max. 2016. "Researchers have Found a Troubling New Cause of Death for Middle-aged White American." Washington Post (November 23).

Schlesinger, Jonathan. 2016. "China's Tangled Environmental History." The Diplomat (November 5). 
 

Lecture 12 (March 28): Transportation and Communication Networks, Consumption

Mandatory VideoS
 

-Transportation
Battleship Potemkin. 1925. 17 - All Against One. Will They Open Fire? 

Financial Times. 2013. "Container Shipping. The World in a Box."

DHL. 2015. DHL International Supply Chain

Heathrow Airport. 2012. What is a Hub Airport? 

Yanofsky, David. 2015. "Watch the Invisible Patterns of Sea Cargo cover the Earth." Quartz (February 23).

Plumer, Brad. 2016. "This is an Incredible Visualization of the World's Shipping Routes (Updated)." Vox (August 6).

-Others
Learn Liberty. 2014. "Foreigners Are Our Friends - Econ Chronicles" (Bryan Caplan).

Social Media Marketing Tips. 2017. "Let Go of the Things You Can't Control and Move the F*ck On [Gary Vaynerchuk]." 
 

Mandatory readings
 

Hayter and Patchell, chapters 13-14
 

Final Exam - Sat. Apr. 8th 9-11 am RAWC Gym C

 

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